Randolph Law has put together a round-up of recent news and regulatory changes that impact government contractors today. Read on to learn more about upcoming compliance issues, changes in regulations, and opportunities for government contractors. 

The Projected Impact of the Trump Administration on Government Contractors

Government contractors no longer need to disclose potential labor violations when bidding on a contract, as per President Trump’s repeal of the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces executive order. Federal contractors should be aware that the Trump administration is expected to preserve Executive Order 11246, which forbids discrimination on the basis of gender or sexual orientation. However, questions remain about how the administration will handle Executive Order 13706, which requires paid sick leave for workers on federal contracts.

“Buy American & Hire American” Order Could Impact Federal Contractors

While the federal government has always maintained requirements that favor buying American-made products and hiring American contractors, Trump’s April 18thBuy American & Hire American” order attempts to strengthen those requirements and increase preference for U.S. manufacturing and employment. It’s recommended that federal contractors take care to evaluate their existing compliance policies in preparation for the order’s enforcement and the similar government contract regulations that can be expected in the near future.

Digital Services Acquisition Training to Expand

In an effort to combat recent backslides in IT modernization and innovation, the federal government is preparing to increase agile acquisition efforts. The U.S. Digital Services department will be working alongside federal agencies to improve agile procurement and scale up the Digital IT Acquisition Professional Training Program for contracting officers. Ultimately, federal contractors in the IT space should have more opportunities to work with the government and influence technological innovation.

Contractors Who Use Standard Confidentiality Language May Be Disqualified

Raising a compliance issue for federal contractors, FAR 52.203-19 prohibits contractors from requiring their employees or subcontractors to sign a standard agreement that might prevent them from reporting fraud, waste, or abuse while working on a federal contract. Contractors must cease to use such confidentiality agreements and must notify all of their employees – even those not currently working on a federal contract – that the agreements no longer apply.

Do you have questions about remaining in compliance with federal regulations or expanding your opportunities with the federal government? Contact Randolph Law’s team of government contract attorneys for assistance.